toddler with phone.jpg
toddler with phone.jpg


‘Ubuntu’ - a southern African term which roughly translates as ‘doing something for others’



‘Ubuntu’ - a southern African term which roughly translates as ‘doing something for others’


As the reach of our work grows, we are always keen to invite new volunteer doctors to join our team. Both generalists and specialists are welcome, especially if you have experience in sub-Saharan Africa or a similar setting (though this is desirable, rather than essential).

How does it work?

  • Volunteer doctors are sent email notification of a patient case file and log on to the Virtual Doctor software.
  • You view the case file and associated documentation (for example, the locally available drugs list and diagnostic test list).
  • Each case needs a response within 48 hours (out of office available) with the addition of educational material where possible. 
  • Case files are limited to two per week, per volunteer doctor, and typically take about 20 minutes each to deal with.
  • Each case can be reassigned by the volunteer if it falls outside of their medical knowledge/speciality

If you are interested in joining our team, or have further questions, we would love to hear from you. Email Fran to register your interest and follow @franvirtualdocs



At the Virtual Doctors we are lucky to have volunteers giving their time and talents to essential areas of our organisation, but we can’t do what we need to without funding to enable our work. We need your help!

No matter what skills and experience you have, or how much time you have to give, your support will make a difference. 

The Virtual Doctors service is funded entirely by our supporters’ generous donations and gifts, so we especially welcome those with an interest in fundraising. You could:

  • speak to church or community groups about our work
  •  participate in a challenge event 
  •  host a sponsored activity
  • advocate for the Virtual Doctors to be supported by your company…
  •  …or something completely different!

Email Ros to register your interest or request a fundraising guide.




I have always wanted to work in the developing world and trained as a GP specifically to give me the skill set to do this. In 2001 I worked in a rural hospital in Zambia followed by months travelling around southern Africa. I was hooked. But I was uneasy about the lack of impact my voluntary work had, or its sustainability.

I began searching for voluntary work that would educate and support local health workers yet could be done whilst being based in the UK. I read an article about the Virtual Doctors in the British Medical Journal and volunteered.

Right away, I couldn’t get over how simple it was to help a health worker, so far away, manage a patient. I’ve answered cases wherever I am: at the kitchen table; in a tent in Wales; or by the pool in Lanzarote. All I need is an internet connection.
— Dr Fran Fieldhouse